Sunday, October 11, 2009

Preparing for the cold season

I ache and I'm not moving very fast today. Indian Summer is over and the days will not be very warm from now on. We need to heat the house. I hear you ask: where's the problem - just turn on the furnace?
Well, we live in a very old farmhouse - we don't know for sure, but we're guessing about 130 years old. It has, of course, undergone changes during the decades, but it is still an old house. It does not have a furnace. We installed a stovelike apparatus in the kitchen, which heats the ground floor of the house; like a central heating system. It pumps hot water through the pipes and the heating elements. So far, so good. This stove is a wood fired stove. Which means - we need wood for heating. So every year, we need to fill our wood shed with wood (Yes, I do really live out in the country, way out in the country). Yesterday our firewood was delivered (more like, dumped in our driveway), the forecast was predicting rain and we were moving the wood into the shed and stacking it. Want to see what approximately 20 cubic meters of firewood look like? See below:




Well, now my back and my legs are aching a bit, but I will be able to keep the house warm.
On a lighter note (much lighter, believe me!), here are some fall impressions around the house.




We did go to the flea market this morning (before hauling in the last bit of wood; it did start to pour yesterday, so we covered the remaining wood pile with a tarp), but didn't find any treasures. Better luck hunting next time.

16 comments:

mairedodd said...

wow - that is a lot of work & hopefully a lot of warmth... the foliage shots are beautiful... i could see the second one on a card...

Such a Wondrous Place this Faery Space said...

Our house was also built in the 1860's and though we do have a furnace, my husband attached a woodburner and so I know the stacks look with wood in our yard all cut by him. I understand not wanting to let go of the summer and realize the need for the warmth of fire, friendship and kindness. Blessings and stay cozy.

Lenna Andrews said...

what a lot of work! but worth it : ) you will be cozy & warm now. i love the photos you took and especially those of the beautiful red Fall leaves . . . .

sharon said...

The house you describe and the glimpses I've seen of it really look magical Renate! Of course magic carries a lot of work with it I can see!! I actually envy you, it seems like a simpler way of live to me....your place looks gorgeous, as well as the photos!! Just gorgeous!!!

Barbara said...

Well, I'm officially impressed that you stacked ALL of that wood yesterday!! Ugh! But I do love the smell of a real wood fire. I don't live in the country, far from it, and they frown on smokey fires here. But I must admit, I despise those chemical logs that burn for hours. Give me real wood, preferably pinion, any day. Heaven. (But not necessarily if my life depended on it!!) Feel better (warmer!) xo B

sherry ♥ lee said...

What we take for granted...a furnace and a switch to turn it on. It makes us lazy in so many ways. You are still living like a pioneer with your heating...the saving grace is that you didn't have to cut down the trees for the firewood and at least it was delivered. But you are so right about dumping it -- when we used to use our fireplace that is how the wood was delivered and it is back breaking work to haul it in and stack it. I can well imagine how your muscles are reacting today.

You have warmth ready for the winter months which is lovely! And your photographs of the autumn are gorgeous! Go rest!!!

mermaiden said...

it takes a lot of work to live in an enchanted place, doesn't it ;]

break out the hats, scarves, and mittens!

PhilipH said...

Back-breaking work, lifting and stacking logs. I know that for sure as it's something I have to do here in Scotland. It's been a beautiful day today but the easterly and northerly winds are definitely paying us visits and the cottage needs to be kept well warm.

Lovely photographs. Autumn colours are so extravagantly and richly beautiful.

Narrative jewelry said...

Oh yes, i can understand how much your back and legs would ache, we had to do the same 3 years ago when we lived in a "bergerie". But the warmth of the fire, the sound and the smell help to forget how difficult it was to stack.

The colors of your virginia creeper is just gorgeous. Maire is right when she said about making a card with this photo. We haven't too much red leaves for the moment in Brittany, the trees are still green, not for a long time alas !

Bisous,

Cindy said...

Oh Renate, I did not realize you lived in an old farmhouse!! That is really very old..so fascinating. I'd love to see more pictures from around your house. I don't think I've ever seen such a huge stack of firewood. I bet you slept well after stacking all of that! I hope it keeps you warm and toasty!

Silke said...

Oh, wow, Renate, you do live out in the country! It reminds me of our house in the New Mexico mountains where we heated primarily with a woodburning stove. It sounds so romantic and when it's all said and done, it really is, but the cutting and stacking of wood really is a LOT of work. My hat is off to you!! Stay warm and cozy (still close to 25 degrees C here). Hugs, Silke

Wanda said...

We have a woodburning stove for supplenmental heating too...there is no warmer feeling or atmosphere to compare with a fire on a cold winter day...
Your stacked wood is beautiful...I too have done my share of stacking firewood.

sundownbeaddesigns said...

Oh my...I feel your pain. When I was growing up we also lived in an old farmhouse that was heated only with wood. I have many memories of going with my dad to cut firewood, then stacking and hauling it all winter long. But I must say I do miss being able to cuddle up next to the stove... The foliage pictures are beautiful.

SharonP said...

You deserve to sit in front of that roaring fire sipping hot chai with honey and a wee dram of brandy for your aches! Congrats on the fruits of your labor.

lilylovekin said...

I love a fire, but have never had to heat a house with one. It sure takes alot of wood. I hope you stay warm this winter.

Laume said...

We had nothing but wood heat for many decades. I have fond memories of it but have to say that being able to use our newly installed gas wall heater the last couple of years has been a nice treat. I do miss the quiet of wood heat though. We can still use up some of our leftover cords of wood in our fireplace though.